Procreate Doodle 2

Procreate Doodle 2

Had fun with the Procreate app again! This time, I decided to add a title and ending card to the video I created in iMovie. Still not entirely confident with video editing and uploading to YouTube, but it is fun to post these iPad speed paintings of mine only using my finger and a generic stylus. Since I recently bought a book called Lifestyle Illustrations of the 1950s, it inspired me to use one of the illustrations by Frank Bellamy as a reference.

“This world is but a canvas to our imagination.” -Henry David Thoreau

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Speed Doodling in Procreate

Seeing other artists create speed paintings has peeked my interest enough that I have been wanting to figure out how to create my own. There are moments where I know I have a lot to do, but I just want to take a moment to create something for myself. This time I wanted to figure out how to do a quick video of a digital illustration that I could do on my iPad. I already had the Procreate app on there and what is wonderful is it already records every action as a frame of video.

To export the video, you can go to your Actions menu while on the canvas, tap Share, and tap Export Video. Mine took a little while at first so be patient! I chose to email it to myself since I wanted to pop it into iMovie to add music. The music was already an option to use in iMovie, and I thought about adding info about me to the video but I was impatient.

One thing I noticed right away after creating the movie, the colors appeared a bit different on my computer screen from what I chose on the iPad. Be aware this could happen! Of course, since I did the doodle rather fast, every time I look at it I feel I could make it a little brighter and give it higher contrast. Artist’s work is never done right? 🙂

Click here to see the speed painting video on YouTube of the drawing you see below!

Speed Doodling in Procreate

Vintage Post: Artist Journals & Cat Character

This post was written during my last semester of college while I was taking an Illustration course and just starting to get into art journaling on the side. I absolutely loved the Illustration class but looking back at the cat character I chose, I wish I had done one of the other sketches. Oh well! It was a learning experience since I was not comfortable creating illustration work on the computer.

Original Post from March 19, 2009

Found another appealing book at the library called Art Journals & Creative Healing by Sharon Soneff! It has a different take on the idea of the art journal. The artist described her book the best in her introduction:

“Journals serve many worthy purposes-to document major events, capture fleeting moments, develop raw ideas, even to chronicle what you dreamed last night. But has it ever occurred to you that a journal could be used to assist with, and promote, health and healing?…Art Journals & Creative Healing explores the combination of these two therapeutic exercises-the written expression with the artistic one-resulting in a venue for pushing beyond difficult human experiences to a place of newfound wisdom, peace, comfort, joy, health, and healing.”

The examples inside are not necessarily done by artists who know how to draw, but there are definitely more crafty people who have done these journals. I believe anyone could do these types of journals. They don’t have to look perfect, and they don’t have to be seen by anyone other than yourself. Even if you may not want to make your journal therapeutic for yourself, it still contains some great ideas or possibilities for any kind of journal.

Some great suggestions I grabbed from the book (I embellished some of them) are:

1. Maybe you want to tear up sheets of paper that you find and instead of gluing them in, tape them! Give your pages that edgy look!

2. Recycle an old day planner by altering it. You can use artist’s Gesso to coat the pages so you can have a blank sheet, and it will help stiffen the paper and ready it for either paint, pastels, pencils, etc.

3. Another way to attach pieces of paper to the page is to literally sew it on! Adding some stitching will give the page texture.

4. Write down your favorite quotes!

5. Plus, don’t feel like you have to do one page at a time. You can revisit a page after you have painted a background.

6. Finally, a journal does not have to be bound! You can use loose sheets of random paper you find or index cards. Then keep them together in a special box or folder. Just have fun with it!

Animorphic Cat Character

This week, I have been working on this character for Illustration class. Thought I would post it up! It is NOT complete yet. It is just the B&W tonal version of it so our professor could see what direction we would take the character.